Data visualization

SIPS 2017 Conference Tweets

Exploring SIPS Tweets with R.

Visualizing varying effects' posteriors with joyplots

You should probably use ‘joy plots’ to visualize varying effects’ posteriors, because they look great.

Where are all the consciousness scientists?

In this blog post, I use metadata from 70k Psychology journal articles, published in 25 journals from Scopus, to visualize ‘consciousness hubs’, or academic institutions that publish (more than other institutions) research on consciousness.

Quantitative literature review with R: Exploring Psychonomic Society Journals, Part II

In this tutorial, I’ll show how to use R to quantitatively explore, analyze, and visualize a research literature, using Psychonomic Society publications. This post directly continues from part I of Quantitative literature review with R. Please read that first for context. Part I focused on data cleaning and simple figures, but here we will look at relational data by visualizing some network structures in the data.

Quantitative literature review with R: Exploring Psychonomic Society Journals, Part I

In this tutorial, I’ll show how to use R to quantitatively explore, analyze, and visualize a research literature, using Psychonomic Society’s publications

Better forest plots from meta-analytic models estimated with brms

An R function for drawing forest plots from meta-analytic models estimated with the brms R package.

How to create within-subject scatter plots in R with ggplot2

Today, we’ll take a look at creating a specific type of visualization for data from a within-subjects experiment. You’ll often see within-subject data visualized as bar graphs (condition means, and maybe mean difference if you’re lucky.) But alternatives exist, and today we’ll take a look at within-subjects scatterplots.

Scraping Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science

Warning: 'theme_blog' is deprecated. ## Use 'theme_vmisc' instead. ## See help("Deprecated") Hi everybody!

Today I’ll share some tips on elementary web scraping with R. Our goal is to download and process an entire Wordpress blog into an R data frame, which can then be visualized and analyzed for fun and discovery. We’ll scrape andrewgelman.com, the home of “Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science”. This is a very popular statistics and social science blog, whose main author, Andrew Gelman is a famous statistician and political scientist, and author of such classic holiday thrillers as Bayesian Data Analysis and Data Analysis Using Regression and Multilevel Models.

How to arrange ggplot2 panel plots

Panel plots are a common name for figures showing every person’s (or whatever your sampling unit is) data in their own little panel. This plot is sometimes also known as “small multiples”, although that more commonly refers to plots that illustrate interactions. Here, I’ll illustrate how to add information to a panel plot by arranging the panels according to some meaningful value. Here’s an example of a panel plot, using the sleepstudy data set from the lme4 package.

GitHub-style waffle plots in R

I have a little python script on my work computer that tracks hours I’ve spent in the office (assuming that those hours begin with a computer login, and end in a computer shutdown–sadly this is almost always true.) I don’t really do anything with the information, and it is really a remnant of my time as a contract worker. However, for shared or billed projects, such automation of data gathering can be very valuable.